Location

Collier Library

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. Michael Pretes

Event Website

https://www.una.edu/studentresearch/index.html

Start Date

22-4-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2019 11:00 AM

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Description

Recent media reports have suggested that matters of the Milennial Generation (born 1981-1997) and Generation Z (born after 1997) are les inclined to visit national parks, compared to older generations. We used three methods to examin the validity of these media statements: Qualtrics-based social media surveys (on Facebook, Twitter, and instagram), face to face semi-structured interviews with park rangers at four Pacific coast national parks-Redwood, Crater Lkae, Mount Rainier, and Olympic-and on-site visitor counts at visitor centers and on trails. We compared the observations with the limited historical data on vistor ages avaliable from the National Park Service. Our results suggest that media reports are overstated, and that the number of both Millennial Generation and Gernation Z members visiting national parks is at least stable and perhaps even increasing. A possible explanation for divergent results is that younger people may be accessing park information through online and social media sources, and therfore bypassing visitor centsrs and direct contact with park rangers.

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Apr 22nd, 10:00 AM Apr 22nd, 11:00 AM

Youth Visitor Dynamics in Four Pacific Coast National Parks

Collier Library

Recent media reports have suggested that matters of the Milennial Generation (born 1981-1997) and Generation Z (born after 1997) are les inclined to visit national parks, compared to older generations. We used three methods to examin the validity of these media statements: Qualtrics-based social media surveys (on Facebook, Twitter, and instagram), face to face semi-structured interviews with park rangers at four Pacific coast national parks-Redwood, Crater Lkae, Mount Rainier, and Olympic-and on-site visitor counts at visitor centers and on trails. We compared the observations with the limited historical data on vistor ages avaliable from the National Park Service. Our results suggest that media reports are overstated, and that the number of both Millennial Generation and Gernation Z members visiting national parks is at least stable and perhaps even increasing. A possible explanation for divergent results is that younger people may be accessing park information through online and social media sources, and therfore bypassing visitor centsrs and direct contact with park rangers.

https://ir.una.edu/scholarsweek2019/2019/posters/7