Event Title

Assessing Tick Species Occurrence on Common Rodent Reservoir Species

Location

Collier Library

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. Jacob Dittel

Event Website

https://www.una.edu/studentresearch/index.html

Start Date

22-4-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2019 11:00 AM

Document Type

Poster Presentation

Description

Tick-borne diseases are a common cause of concern for both healthcare providers and wildlife professionals alike because they potentially carry diseases that can be spread between wildlife and to humans. Occurrence and density of ticks are tightly correlated to the abundance and richness of their host species. This study proposes to assess the prevalence of potential disease carrying species in heavily managed habitats in eastern Oregon that have been affected by invasive annual grass invasion and recent wildfires. These degraded but managed lands have drastically changed the small mammal community but the effect on ectoparasite communities, particularly ticks, remains unknown. In order to assess tick richness and abundance, tick samples will be removed and identified from trapped rodent species. We will focus on the rodent species: Mountain Vole, Microtus montanus, Deer Mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, and Least Chipmunks, Tamias minimus, as previous studies have shown they are the most prevalent in the study area. We will primarily be looking for the most common tick species acting as vectors in the United States which include: Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes pacificus, Dermacentor andersoni, and Dermacentor occidentalis , all members of the Family Ixodidae. Tick samples will be mapped using GPS points to visually determine potential hot spots of infection as well as possible vertebrate habits. Linear regression models and results tables will be generated via R statistical analysis.

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Apr 22nd, 10:00 AM Apr 22nd, 11:00 AM

Assessing Tick Species Occurrence on Common Rodent Reservoir Species

Collier Library

Tick-borne diseases are a common cause of concern for both healthcare providers and wildlife professionals alike because they potentially carry diseases that can be spread between wildlife and to humans. Occurrence and density of ticks are tightly correlated to the abundance and richness of their host species. This study proposes to assess the prevalence of potential disease carrying species in heavily managed habitats in eastern Oregon that have been affected by invasive annual grass invasion and recent wildfires. These degraded but managed lands have drastically changed the small mammal community but the effect on ectoparasite communities, particularly ticks, remains unknown. In order to assess tick richness and abundance, tick samples will be removed and identified from trapped rodent species. We will focus on the rodent species: Mountain Vole, Microtus montanus, Deer Mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, and Least Chipmunks, Tamias minimus, as previous studies have shown they are the most prevalent in the study area. We will primarily be looking for the most common tick species acting as vectors in the United States which include: Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes pacificus, Dermacentor andersoni, and Dermacentor occidentalis , all members of the Family Ixodidae. Tick samples will be mapped using GPS points to visually determine potential hot spots of infection as well as possible vertebrate habits. Linear regression models and results tables will be generated via R statistical analysis.

https://ir.una.edu/scholarsweek2019/2019/posters/4