Location

GUC Loft

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. Ryan Zayac

Event Website

https://www.una.edu/studentresearch/index.html

Start Date

22-4-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

22-4-2019 11:00 AM

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Description

The purpose of this research is to take a closer look at the poor teaching behavior checklist. The poor teaching behavior checklist is a 15-item checklist that was developed to provide a structured evaluation of poor teaching behaviors (Busler, Kirk, Keeley, & Buskist, 2017). The poor teaching behavior checklist was developed in response to research performed by Buskist, Sikorski, Buckley, and Saville (2002) where they developed a Teacher Behavior Checklist (TBC) that was focused on evaluating a teacher’s good teaching behaviors (Busler et al., 2017). While the TBC revealed what constituted good teaching behaviors, it did not identify the characteristics and corresponding behaviors of ineffective teachers. Busler and colleagues found that the poor teaching behavior checklist to be a near inverse of the TBC, meaning that nearly all the behaviors on the poor teaching behavior checklist were the opposite of a behavior on the TBC. Initial data on the poor teaching behavior checklist suggest that good and ineffective teaching are not simply the inverse of one another, but that overall teaching quality revolves around key reciprocals that are centered on what a teacher knows about their area of expertise and how they interact with their students (Busler et al., 2017). This means that while use of the TBC can improve a teacher’s overall quality of teaching it takes both the TBC and the poor teaching behavior checklist to determine what behaviors to improve and what behaviors to avoid (Busler et al., 2017). While the initial data on the poor teaching behavior checklist is interesting, it is limited. The purpose of this research is to collect additional data to examine the generality of the poor teaching behavior checklist. The current study will expand data collection to include students from a regional, comprehensive university, as well as students from other diverse institutions (e.g., community colleges, small liberal arts colleges), as well as faculty. Data will be gathered using a Qualtrics online survey. Data collection is currently in progress.

References Buskist, W., Sikorski, J., Buckley, T., & Saville, B. K. (2002). Elements of master teaching. The teaching of psychology: Essays in honor of Wilbert J. McKeachie and Charles L. Brewer, 1, 27-39. Busler, J., Kirk, C., Keeley, J., & Buskist, W. (2017). What constitutes poor teaching? A preliminary inquiry into the misbehaviors of not-so-good instructors. Teaching Of Psychology, 44(4), 330-334."

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Apr 22nd, 10:45 AM Apr 22nd, 11:00 AM

University Students and Faculty Perceptions of Characteristics of Poor/Ineffective Teachers

GUC Loft

The purpose of this research is to take a closer look at the poor teaching behavior checklist. The poor teaching behavior checklist is a 15-item checklist that was developed to provide a structured evaluation of poor teaching behaviors (Busler, Kirk, Keeley, & Buskist, 2017). The poor teaching behavior checklist was developed in response to research performed by Buskist, Sikorski, Buckley, and Saville (2002) where they developed a Teacher Behavior Checklist (TBC) that was focused on evaluating a teacher’s good teaching behaviors (Busler et al., 2017). While the TBC revealed what constituted good teaching behaviors, it did not identify the characteristics and corresponding behaviors of ineffective teachers. Busler and colleagues found that the poor teaching behavior checklist to be a near inverse of the TBC, meaning that nearly all the behaviors on the poor teaching behavior checklist were the opposite of a behavior on the TBC. Initial data on the poor teaching behavior checklist suggest that good and ineffective teaching are not simply the inverse of one another, but that overall teaching quality revolves around key reciprocals that are centered on what a teacher knows about their area of expertise and how they interact with their students (Busler et al., 2017). This means that while use of the TBC can improve a teacher’s overall quality of teaching it takes both the TBC and the poor teaching behavior checklist to determine what behaviors to improve and what behaviors to avoid (Busler et al., 2017). While the initial data on the poor teaching behavior checklist is interesting, it is limited. The purpose of this research is to collect additional data to examine the generality of the poor teaching behavior checklist. The current study will expand data collection to include students from a regional, comprehensive university, as well as students from other diverse institutions (e.g., community colleges, small liberal arts colleges), as well as faculty. Data will be gathered using a Qualtrics online survey. Data collection is currently in progress.

References Buskist, W., Sikorski, J., Buckley, T., & Saville, B. K. (2002). Elements of master teaching. The teaching of psychology: Essays in honor of Wilbert J. McKeachie and Charles L. Brewer, 1, 27-39. Busler, J., Kirk, C., Keeley, J., & Buskist, W. (2017). What constitutes poor teaching? A preliminary inquiry into the misbehaviors of not-so-good instructors. Teaching Of Psychology, 44(4), 330-334."

https://ir.una.edu/scholarsweek2019/2019/oral_presentations/3