Location

GUC Loft

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. Kevin B. Stoltz

Event Website

https://www.una.edu/studentresearch/index.html

Start Date

22-4-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

22-4-2019 10:45 AM

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Description

"The subject of engineering identity development continues to be an area of serious inquiry. Much of the present research has focused on supporting and strengthening an engineering identity through formal educational and extra-curricular experiences. These studies reveal a noticeable effect of educational experiences designed to support and grow an engineering identity. However, little research has focused on exploring the early life experiences of engineers or engineering students with the intent of understanding how these individuals developed and recognized interests and aptitudes for engineering. The goal of the current study is to determine what early life experiences as told by engineers and engineering students guided these individuals to the profession. Fundamentally, this research question represents the belief that aspects of engineering identities form in the child’s natural environment and that specific aspects of memory recall are indicative of career identity. This understanding of individual engineering perspectives may help people in the career decision-making process consider engineering as a serious career alternative for further exploration.

The research team consisted of one UNA graduate student, one UNA faculty mentor and two faculty members. The graduate student and research mentor conducted field interviews and collected data by using a Demographic survey, Career Construction Interview, and a modified Life Story Questionnaire Interview. Participants consisted of two senior engineering students from the UNA Engineering Technology program and one faculty member from SET Department.

The purpose of this study is to explore the early experiences of engineers and engineering students helping participants to narrate a career identity story for qualitative analysis. Results may be helpful in understanding how individuals recognize important engineering skills and develop a mindset for engineering. These results may provide information about specific indicators and perceptions that may signal the development of an engineering identity in childhood, adolescence, or early adulthood."

Included in

Engineering Commons

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Apr 22nd, 10:30 AM Apr 22nd, 10:45 AM

Engineering Identity: A Life Story Approach

GUC Loft

"The subject of engineering identity development continues to be an area of serious inquiry. Much of the present research has focused on supporting and strengthening an engineering identity through formal educational and extra-curricular experiences. These studies reveal a noticeable effect of educational experiences designed to support and grow an engineering identity. However, little research has focused on exploring the early life experiences of engineers or engineering students with the intent of understanding how these individuals developed and recognized interests and aptitudes for engineering. The goal of the current study is to determine what early life experiences as told by engineers and engineering students guided these individuals to the profession. Fundamentally, this research question represents the belief that aspects of engineering identities form in the child’s natural environment and that specific aspects of memory recall are indicative of career identity. This understanding of individual engineering perspectives may help people in the career decision-making process consider engineering as a serious career alternative for further exploration.

The research team consisted of one UNA graduate student, one UNA faculty mentor and two faculty members. The graduate student and research mentor conducted field interviews and collected data by using a Demographic survey, Career Construction Interview, and a modified Life Story Questionnaire Interview. Participants consisted of two senior engineering students from the UNA Engineering Technology program and one faculty member from SET Department.

The purpose of this study is to explore the early experiences of engineers and engineering students helping participants to narrate a career identity story for qualitative analysis. Results may be helpful in understanding how individuals recognize important engineering skills and develop a mindset for engineering. These results may provide information about specific indicators and perceptions that may signal the development of an engineering identity in childhood, adolescence, or early adulthood."

https://ir.una.edu/scholarsweek2019/2019/oral_presentations/2