Event Title

North Alabama Rock Art Project

Location

GUC Loft

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. George J. Makowski

Event Website

https://www.una.edu/studentresearch/index.html

Start Date

23-4-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

23-4-2019 1:15 PM

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Description

Photogrammetry is a process where a series of images of an object are captured (for example the petroglyph or headstone) and then processed through a 3D modeling software revealing details hard to see with the naked eye. This form of data collection is valuable in the documentation since it preserves images that are damaged by natural and human causes. The North Alabama Rock Art Project was developed in an attempt to capture Native America petroglyphs in the area while also capturing hard to read headstones in the local cemeteries. The goal of the project is to preserve petroglyphs and headstones at risk of destruction. A curriculum using the images will allow students from any age group to use the technology to learn about rock art as part of the cultural heritage. Younger aged children can use models created by 3D printing to create their own version of petroglyphs or a mini versions of the ones found at the Tennessee Valley Art Museum. For high school aged students and the college students, the educational component includes finding potential sites to photograph, learning how to photograph the sites, and then using the software to create the images.

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Apr 23rd, 1:00 PM Apr 23rd, 1:15 PM

North Alabama Rock Art Project

GUC Loft

Photogrammetry is a process where a series of images of an object are captured (for example the petroglyph or headstone) and then processed through a 3D modeling software revealing details hard to see with the naked eye. This form of data collection is valuable in the documentation since it preserves images that are damaged by natural and human causes. The North Alabama Rock Art Project was developed in an attempt to capture Native America petroglyphs in the area while also capturing hard to read headstones in the local cemeteries. The goal of the project is to preserve petroglyphs and headstones at risk of destruction. A curriculum using the images will allow students from any age group to use the technology to learn about rock art as part of the cultural heritage. Younger aged children can use models created by 3D printing to create their own version of petroglyphs or a mini versions of the ones found at the Tennessee Valley Art Museum. For high school aged students and the college students, the educational component includes finding potential sites to photograph, learning how to photograph the sites, and then using the software to create the images.

https://ir.una.edu/scholarsweek2019/2019/oral_presentations/17