Event Title

Using laser-excited fluorescence of ruby to detect Be diffusion treatment

Location

GUC Loft

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. D. Brian Thompson

Event Website

https://www.una.edu/studentresearch/index.html

Start Date

23-4-2019 12:30 PM

End Date

23-4-2019 12:45 PM

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Description

Gem rubies and sapphires, different colors of the mineral corundum, tend to fluoresce red when illuminated with green laser light. This red fluorescence arises from trace impurities of the element chromium (Cr) that occur naturally in this mineral. Using a continuous laser source, we can record the spectrum of this fluorescence. Using a pulsed source, we can measure the lifetime of fluorescence decay. Recently a new treatment, called beryllium (Be) diffusion, has come along that improves the color of natural corundum. Be atoms do not occur naturally in corundum. Because the Be atom is so lightweight, developed methods for detecting its presence are difficult and extremely expensive. We have begun exploring whether laser-excited fluorescence can be used to detect the presence of Be in ruby, either by shifting Cr peaks seen in the fluorescence spectrum or by decreasing the Cr fluorescence lifetime. Here I describe our initial tests.

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Apr 23rd, 12:30 PM Apr 23rd, 12:45 PM

Using laser-excited fluorescence of ruby to detect Be diffusion treatment

GUC Loft

Gem rubies and sapphires, different colors of the mineral corundum, tend to fluoresce red when illuminated with green laser light. This red fluorescence arises from trace impurities of the element chromium (Cr) that occur naturally in this mineral. Using a continuous laser source, we can record the spectrum of this fluorescence. Using a pulsed source, we can measure the lifetime of fluorescence decay. Recently a new treatment, called beryllium (Be) diffusion, has come along that improves the color of natural corundum. Be atoms do not occur naturally in corundum. Because the Be atom is so lightweight, developed methods for detecting its presence are difficult and extremely expensive. We have begun exploring whether laser-excited fluorescence can be used to detect the presence of Be in ruby, either by shifting Cr peaks seen in the fluorescence spectrum or by decreasing the Cr fluorescence lifetime. Here I describe our initial tests.

https://ir.una.edu/scholarsweek2019/2019/oral_presentations/15