Location

GUC Loft

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. J. Matthew Green

Event Website

https://www.una.edu/studentresearch/

Start Date

22-4-2019 10:00 AM

End Date

22-4-2019 10:15 AM

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Description

Magnesium (Mg) supplementation may enhance performance. However, effects of Mg supplementation on muscle soreness is not well understood. This study examined effects of Mg supplementation (350mg/day) on muscle soreness and performance in recreationally active individuals. Recreationally active male (n= 4) and females (n= 7) completed four bench press trials including two eccentric (pre-post) bench press trials at 85% of estimated 1 RM for 5 sets of 10 to induce muscle soreness, and two performance trials at 65%, 75%, and 85% of estimated 1 RM to failure. Soreness ratings were measured 24, 36, and 48 hours following each trial using a six-point Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness (DOMS) scale. Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) were measured following each set as well as Overall Session RPE (SRPE) after each trial. Preliminary findings indicated soreness ratings dropped more from 24-36-48 hours in the Mg group (n=6) than the Placebo (Pla) (n=5) group. Pre SRPE was not significantly different for Mg (5.83 ± 2.5) vs Pla (6 ± 1.4) but post SRPE was significantly lower for Mg (4.17 ± 2.1) vs Pla (5.8 ± 1.6). SRPE indicates perceived ratings are sensitive to altered soreness ratings coupled with Mg supplementation. Results thus far indicated Mg supplementation had no effect or change on performance. Extending the understanding of Mg supplementation on muscle soreness could benefit athletes and recreationally active individuals.

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Apr 22nd, 10:00 AM Apr 22nd, 10:15 AM

Effect of Magnesium Supplementation on Muscle Soreness and Performance

GUC Loft

Magnesium (Mg) supplementation may enhance performance. However, effects of Mg supplementation on muscle soreness is not well understood. This study examined effects of Mg supplementation (350mg/day) on muscle soreness and performance in recreationally active individuals. Recreationally active male (n= 4) and females (n= 7) completed four bench press trials including two eccentric (pre-post) bench press trials at 85% of estimated 1 RM for 5 sets of 10 to induce muscle soreness, and two performance trials at 65%, 75%, and 85% of estimated 1 RM to failure. Soreness ratings were measured 24, 36, and 48 hours following each trial using a six-point Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness (DOMS) scale. Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) were measured following each set as well as Overall Session RPE (SRPE) after each trial. Preliminary findings indicated soreness ratings dropped more from 24-36-48 hours in the Mg group (n=6) than the Placebo (Pla) (n=5) group. Pre SRPE was not significantly different for Mg (5.83 ± 2.5) vs Pla (6 ± 1.4) but post SRPE was significantly lower for Mg (4.17 ± 2.1) vs Pla (5.8 ± 1.6). SRPE indicates perceived ratings are sensitive to altered soreness ratings coupled with Mg supplementation. Results thus far indicated Mg supplementation had no effect or change on performance. Extending the understanding of Mg supplementation on muscle soreness could benefit athletes and recreationally active individuals.

https://ir.una.edu/scholarsweek2019/2019/oral_presentations/1