Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lauren G. Killen

Location

University of North Alabama, Guillot University Center Atrium

Start Date

24-4-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

24-4-2018 10:30 AM

Description

Abstract:

Background: Current physical activity guidelines suggest adequate physical activity based on minutes active and intensity level. However, a barrier to achieving suggested levels of physical activity can be achieving appropriate intensities. A potentially easier way to measure activity is through daily step count, but it is currently unknown how one perceives daily step counts.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine how daily step counts were perceived versus actual number of steps achieved.

Methods: Thirty participants, who did not use a physical activity device, wore an Actigraph accelerometer for three days to measure daily step count. At the end of each day, participants estimated the number of steps achieved.

Results: While the comparison of perceived versus actual steps was not significantly different for day 1 (p = .27); whereas, day 2 and day 3 approached significance (p = .12). Upon further analysis, it was determined daily step count is not perceived correctly with the majority being underestimated. Conclusion: The results suggest daily step counts are not accurately perceived. Therefore, it is suggested wearable devices could help track daily steps and potentially motivate individuals to meet the recommend goal of 10,000 steps.

Keywords

Physical Activity; Perceived; Accelerometry; Step Count

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Apr 24th, 9:00 AM Apr 24th, 10:30 AM

Perceived Versus Actual Physical Activity Through Examining Daily Step Counts

University of North Alabama, Guillot University Center Atrium

Abstract:

Background: Current physical activity guidelines suggest adequate physical activity based on minutes active and intensity level. However, a barrier to achieving suggested levels of physical activity can be achieving appropriate intensities. A potentially easier way to measure activity is through daily step count, but it is currently unknown how one perceives daily step counts.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine how daily step counts were perceived versus actual number of steps achieved.

Methods: Thirty participants, who did not use a physical activity device, wore an Actigraph accelerometer for three days to measure daily step count. At the end of each day, participants estimated the number of steps achieved.

Results: While the comparison of perceived versus actual steps was not significantly different for day 1 (p = .27); whereas, day 2 and day 3 approached significance (p = .12). Upon further analysis, it was determined daily step count is not perceived correctly with the majority being underestimated. Conclusion: The results suggest daily step counts are not accurately perceived. Therefore, it is suggested wearable devices could help track daily steps and potentially motivate individuals to meet the recommend goal of 10,000 steps.

https://ir.una.edu/researchdays/2018/posters/9