Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Lisa Blankinship

Location

University of North Alabama, Guillot University Center Atrium

Start Date

24-4-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2018 4:00 PM

Description

Antibiotic resistance makes the treatment of illness a constantly evolving obstacle in drug development. Under ideal conditions, antimicrobial drugs work by either killing bacterial organisms or inhibiting replication. However, bacterial species are able to improve their genetic composition through plasmid conjugation, enabling neutralization of, removal of, or protection from drugs. In a hospital setting, resistant pathogens lead to multi-drug resistant bacterial strains that endanger the lives of patients. The purpose of this project will be to study bacteria that exhibit resistance to antibiotics in the tetracycline, cephalosporin, and carbapenem classes and transfer that resistance to an antibiotic sensitive organism. Tetracycline antibiotics are commonly distributed broad-spectrum drugs. Cephalosporin antibiotics are specific to either gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria. Carbapenem antibiotics are used to treat multi-drug resistant organisms. Evidence of the genetic transfer will be monitored by PCR analysis for antibiotic resistance transfer through plasmid uptake or alterations to genomic DNA. The goal of this experiment is to determine the ability of a nonresistant bacterial species to develop antibiotic resistance from a resistant organism and to identify whether the resistance gene is located on the chromosome or plasmid.

Keywords

antibiotic resistance, plasmids, conjugation, kirby bauer, PCR

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Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Anntibiotic Resistance: Plasmid Transfer Among Bacterial Species Using Antibiotics of the Tetracycline, Cephalosporin, and Carbapenem Classes

University of North Alabama, Guillot University Center Atrium

Antibiotic resistance makes the treatment of illness a constantly evolving obstacle in drug development. Under ideal conditions, antimicrobial drugs work by either killing bacterial organisms or inhibiting replication. However, bacterial species are able to improve their genetic composition through plasmid conjugation, enabling neutralization of, removal of, or protection from drugs. In a hospital setting, resistant pathogens lead to multi-drug resistant bacterial strains that endanger the lives of patients. The purpose of this project will be to study bacteria that exhibit resistance to antibiotics in the tetracycline, cephalosporin, and carbapenem classes and transfer that resistance to an antibiotic sensitive organism. Tetracycline antibiotics are commonly distributed broad-spectrum drugs. Cephalosporin antibiotics are specific to either gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria. Carbapenem antibiotics are used to treat multi-drug resistant organisms. Evidence of the genetic transfer will be monitored by PCR analysis for antibiotic resistance transfer through plasmid uptake or alterations to genomic DNA. The goal of this experiment is to determine the ability of a nonresistant bacterial species to develop antibiotic resistance from a resistant organism and to identify whether the resistance gene is located on the chromosome or plasmid.

https://ir.una.edu/researchdays/2018/posters/3